All Everybody Sees Is Marilyn Monroe

"Being a sex symbol is a heavy load to carry, especially when one is tired, hurt and bewildered" ~ Clara Bow

While discussing her life with George Barris, Marilyn mentioned that she would have liked to work with the French actor Gerard Philipe. Sadly they did not get the opportunity to do so as he passed away of liver cancer in 1959 at the early age of 36.

Marilyn with Elsa Maxwell, Gérard Philipe, Françoise Arnoul, Jean Marais and Arthur Miller at the ‘April in Paris’ ball at the Waldorf-Astoria on April 11,1957. 

Marilyn Monroe, photographed by Milton Greene 1956.

Marilyn Monroe, photographed by Milton Greene 1956.

(Source: ismarilynmonroe)

thediaryofmarilynmonroe:


About Marilyn Monroe:
The phone rang.
Startled out of my reverie, I grabbed it. The voice said, “Miss Monroe is here.”
“She’s here already?” I couldn’t believe it. I was 7 p.m. She was only five hours late.
I slowly put the phone down and took a deep breath. Well, Bert, this is it. I wanted to see her first, before the others did, so I said, “Okay, everybody just stay right here. I’ll be right back.” And I stepped out the door.
As I came down the stairs toward the reception room, I was surprised to see a girl walking toward me on the pathway between the trellises, alone. A scarf covered her hair. I had expected her to be flanked by press agents and bodyguards and God knows who else. Her P.R. girl, Pat Newcomb, was supposed to be there for the sitting. But, no. She had come alone. The sun was setting behind the Hollywood hills, and the girl next door, the girl every man dreams of, was walking slowly toward me in the golden light. I walked up to her. She was a total surprise. 
This was no older woman, voluptuous, aging. She had lost a lot of weight, and the loss had transformed her. She was better than the full-bodied, almost overblown girl I had seen in the movies. In her pale-green slacks and cashmere sweater she was slender and trim, with just enough softness in the right places – all of it hers. She had wrapped a scarf around her hair, and she wore no makeup. Nothing. And she was gorgeous.
I had expected –feared – an elaborate imitation. No. She was the real thing.
“Hi,” I said, “I’m Bert Stern.” I offered her my hand. She took it, and I looked into her eyes. They were blue, green blue. I forgot my marriage, my baby, my dream life in New York, everything but this moment. I was in love.
I took a deep breath and said, “You’re beautiful.”
She looked straight at me, parted her lips, and said, “Really? What a nice thing to say.” Another surprise: her voice. It was more natural, yet distinctive and feminine. She was a natural. Not one of those Hollywood stars who were beyond my reach, but a real, flesh-and-blood girl named Marilyn. I had nothing to fear from her…except, that she might vanish before my eyes now that I’d found her. – Bert Stern

thediaryofmarilynmonroe:

About Marilyn Monroe:

The phone rang.

Startled out of my reverie, I grabbed it. The voice said, “Miss Monroe is here.”

“She’s here already?” I couldn’t believe it. I was 7 p.m. She was only five hours late.

I slowly put the phone down and took a deep breath. Well, Bert, this is it. I wanted to see her first, before the others did, so I said, “Okay, everybody just stay right here. I’ll be right back.” And I stepped out the door.

As I came down the stairs toward the reception room, I was surprised to see a girl walking toward me on the pathway between the trellises, alone. A scarf covered her hair. I had expected her to be flanked by press agents and bodyguards and God knows who else. Her P.R. girl, Pat Newcomb, was supposed to be there for the sitting. But, no. She had come alone. The sun was setting behind the Hollywood hills, and the girl next door, the girl every man dreams of, was walking slowly toward me in the golden light. I walked up to her. She was a total surprise.

This was no older woman, voluptuous, aging. She had lost a lot of weight, and the loss had transformed her. She was better than the full-bodied, almost overblown girl I had seen in the movies. In her pale-green slacks and cashmere sweater she was slender and trim, with just enough softness in the right places – all of it hers. She had wrapped a scarf around her hair, and she wore no makeup. Nothing. And she was gorgeous.

I had expected –feared – an elaborate imitation. No. She was the real thing.

“Hi,” I said, “I’m Bert Stern.” I offered her my hand. She took it, and I looked into her eyes. They were blue, green blue. I forgot my marriage, my baby, my dream life in New York, everything but this moment. I was in love.

I took a deep breath and said, “You’re beautiful.”

She looked straight at me, parted her lips, and said, “Really? What a nice thing to say.” Another surprise: her voice. It was more natural, yet distinctive and feminine. She was a natural. Not one of those Hollywood stars who were beyond my reach, but a real, flesh-and-blood girl named Marilyn. I had nothing to fear from her…except, that she might vanish before my eyes now that I’d found her. – Bert Stern


Marilyn Monroe, photographed by Sam Shaw arriving in New York 1954.

Marilyn Monroe, photographed by Sam Shaw arriving in New York 1954.

(Source: ismarilynmonroe)

misspennydreadful:

Laff Magazine cover that features one of Marilyn’s alternative name choices from early in her career: “Jean Norman.”  (bottom left corner)
 ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶ ✶
From the start of Norma Jeane’s work in acting and modeling, people had suggested that she change her name to something “more sophisticated.”  
Originally, when the studio began to consider names for Norma Jeane to use, their first choice was not Marilyn Monroe.  Her first studio name was actually “Carole Lind,” but Norma Jeane didn’t like it at all, and this name never quite stuck.
 Fox Studio Executive Ben Lyon then worked with Norma Jeane on choosing something different.  Norma Jeane suggested her mother’s maiden name of Monroe, and they discussed the possibility of using “Jean Monroe.”  But Lyon came up with “Marilyn.”  The two M’s would go nicely together, and he had always found the name to be beautiful, since he had been engaged to stage actress Marilyn Miller years before.  He even said Norma Jeane reminded him of his ex-fiancé.  ”Marilyn Monroe” was the final decision.
It took Marilyn some time to get adjusted to her new title…. According to The Marilyn Encyclopedia, in 1952 she revealed, “I’ve never liked the name Marilyn.  I’ve often wished that I had held out that day for Jean Monroe.  But I guess it’s too late to do anything about it now.”

misspennydreadful:

Laff Magazine cover that features one of Marilyn’s alternative name choices from early in her career: “Jean Norman.”  (bottom left corner)

 ✶     

From the start of Norma Jeane’s work in acting and modeling, people had suggested that she change her name to something “more sophisticated.”  

Originally, when the studio began to consider names for Norma Jeane to use, their first choice was not Marilyn Monroe.  Her first studio name was actually “Carole Lind,” but Norma Jeane didn’t like it at all, and this name never quite stuck.

 Fox Studio Executive Ben Lyon then worked with Norma Jeane on choosing something different.  Norma Jeane suggested her mother’s maiden name of Monroe, and they discussed the possibility of using “Jean Monroe.”  But Lyon came up with “Marilyn.”  The two M’s would go nicely together, and he had always found the name to be beautiful, since he had been engaged to stage actress Marilyn Miller years before.  He even said Norma Jeane reminded him of his ex-fiancé.  ”Marilyn Monroe” was the final decision.

It took Marilyn some time to get adjusted to her new title…. According to The Marilyn Encyclopedia, in 1952 she revealed, “I’ve never liked the name Marilyn.  I’ve often wished that I had held out that day for Jean Monroe.  But I guess it’s too late to do anything about it now.